Most monuments to individual military figures proudly display the name of the honoree, but this New York monument refuse to acknowledge the man it was erected for. You can see it, less than 2 hours from Utica.

Credit: National Park Service via Facebook

One of the most infamous names of the Revolutionary War is that of Benedict Arnold, whose betrayal of America to the British is well documented. Before he switched sides, Arnold was a celebrated American soldier, rising through the ranks to become a Major General. "His greatest moment came during the Saratoga campaign where he personally led charge despite his wounded leg and suffered additional damage when his horse went down under him, shattering his already shot leg. The Saratoga campaign ended with a resounding victory for the Americans," writes Kaushik Patowary of Amusing Planet. 

It is that moment of glory that is commemorated by a statue of Arnold's boot, in the Saratoga National Historical Park in Stillwater, depicting his wound. The monument doesn't bear Benedict Arnold's name anywhere.

Legend says after a Arnold betrayed America and joined the British side, "a captured American soldier told Arnold that the leg wounded while fighting for America would be honored while the rest of him would simply be hung." While that may be true or simply a story told through the years, that's exactly what the monument depicts.

Credit: National Park Service via Facebook

The inscription on the back of the monument reads:

“In memory of the “most brilliant soldier” of the Continental Army who was desperately wounded on this spot the sally port of BORGOYNES GREAT WESTERN REDOUBT 7th October, 1777 winning for his countrymen the decisive battle of the American Revolution and for himself the rank of Major General.” 

Now is the perfect time to become better acquainted with America's history - and learn why this military monument - to a specific person - is the only one like it to not bear the honoree's name.