Don't confuse your stimulus payment for junk mail. That's the warning from the Better Business Bureau.

We're so used to getting junk mail at home that usually, an unmarked envelope goes straight in the trash. Unfortunately, that habit could be costing Americans some serious cash.

The Better Business Bureau says its been getting calls from concerned Americans about a pre-paid debit card they received in an unmarked envelope, stating it's their stimulus payment. Those stimulus payments can be up to $1200 per adult, and $500 per child - so trashing it is a costly mistake.

It turns out those debit cards are totally legit. The IRS is sending out pre-paid debit cards to about 4 million Americans, instead of paper checks, reports Rochester First.

Those who receive Economic Impact Payment by prepaid debit card can do the following without any fees:

  • Make purchases online and at any retail location where Visa is accepted
  • Get cash from in-network ATMs
  • Transfer funds to their personal bank account
  • Check their card balance online, by mobile app, or by phone

According to the IRS website, "These Economic Impact Payment Cards arrive in a plain envelope from Money Network Cardholder Services. The Visa name will appear on the front of the card; the back of the card has the name of the issuing bank, MetaBank®, N.A. Information included with the card will explain that the card is an Economic Impact Payment Card."

Credit: IRS.gov

Bottom line, if you get an unmarked envelope - open it up before you decide to toss it. It could save you some serious money.