You love your pet - which is why you take the time to protect your furry friend from fleas and ticks. Unfortunately, scammers are taking advantage of your protective instinct.

Central New York Can Expect a 'Tick Explosion' This Summer

Seresto collars are designed to protect pets from fleas and ticks. These collars are not cheap - ranging from $35-$50 each. If you search the web trying to save a few dollars on the collars - you could be getting scammed.

Credit: Bayer Animal Health/Amazon.com

Several vets have posted warnings about counterfeit Seresto collars that have been purchased online, and are giving consumers tips to tell if the collar they purchased is the real deal.

  • The tin that the collar arrives in should be printed with the image and information. There should not be a paper label or sticker on the tin.
  • A counterfeit collar will have an odor.
  • There should not be a date printed on the tin.
  • If the collar is not working, it's likely a fake.

According to one veterinarian, "Seresto collars should have NO dates on the tin. The inside of the tin color should have a metallic sheen. The print on the collar should be lasered/etched in collar, not stamped on collar."

If the price you're paying online for a collar seems too good to be true - it probably is. This is a time when you want to purchase your collar from a reputable outlet or your veterinarian.

If you have any doubts whether a collar you purchased is the real deal, bring it to your vet, or contact the Bayer, the manufacturer of the collar. 1-800-255-6826 is Bayer’s Consumer Contact Number.

Here's another post that's been circulating around Facebook: