If you have a family member living in a nursing home or long term care facility, you're advised to make sure their stimulus check isn't being used as payment for care.

The Internal Revenue Service alerted nursing home and other care facilities that Economic Impact Payments belong to the residents, not the organizations providing the care.

The IRS issued the warning following concerns people and businesses may be taking advantage of vulnerable populations who received the stimulus check.

The payments are intended for the recipients, even if a nursing home or other facility or provider receives the person's payment, either directly or indirectly by direct deposit or check. These payments do not count as a resource for purposes of determining eligibility for Medicaid and other federal programs for a period of 12 months from receipt. They also do not count as income in determining eligibility for these programs.

The IRS noted the Economic Impact Payments do not count as resources that have to be turned over by benefit recipients, such as residents of nursing homes whose care is provided for by Medicaid.

The Grand Rehabilitation and Nursing took a proactive approach. "Since we are prohibited from using the stimulus checks for payment of care, we had an audit to  make sure all checks were properly deposited for our residents," Bruce Gendron, Vice President of the Grand Healthcare System said. "One resident had concerns about their check but our audit discovered the money was put into their resident fund account at the facility and not used as payment."

"I was given a print to show my stimulus check was deposited into my account," said Thomas. "I'm grateful and hope others spread the word to make sure all facilities are depositing checks properly."

Family members or a power of attorney should check to see stimulus checks are being given to residents living in a nursing home or long term care facility and not being used as payment.

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