Am I the only one who didn't know about this?

Just because you have a smart phone doesn't mean your smart. I learned that that the other day.

I also learned about a cool feature that my iPhone has that I didn't know existed.

Phones have come along way since the giant one that Zack Morris had on Saved By the Bell. I remember when I was 16 I begged my parents to loan me enough money to buy a car that had a car phone built in to it.

Do you remember those massive Nextel phones that had the Two-way radio feature? I had one. I weighed as much as a brick. It was almost indestructible though. I remember losing mine in a snowstorm and I found it two days later buried in the snow. The snow melted and this thing still worked. I'm not kidding it even still had battery life left.

I know I'm starting to sound old but you're never too old to keep learning.

They don't make them like they used to but they do make them with some much better features.

How long have you had a smartphone? I've had an iPhone for about 10 years now and just yesterday I learned that if you want to type the degree symbol when typing out a temperature all you have to do is hold down the 'zero' key.

No, I didn't stumble on this all on my own. I saw that someone shared it on Twitter. I consider this the most significant information shared on the site in the last year.

LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.