A popular Old Forge landmark is no more.

The fountain on the lakefront in Old Forge has been removed. But why?

The reason for the removal of the fountain is really quite simple said Town of Webb councilwoman Barbara Green. It's outlived its useful life.

Credit - Joanne Lorenz Nells Iraggi via Facebook
Credit - Joanne Lorenz Nells Iraggi via Facebook
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Failing Fountain

The fountain, which was built in 1968, ran from the lake and drew sand, causing lots of problems. "The Department of Public Works has had to work on the fountain every year since it's been there. From peeling paint to replacing chunks of concrete that fell off. "

The time finally came to stop making costly repairs and start thinking about something new. "The fountain was cool at the time but we are moving into the 21st century with revitalization plans for the waterfront."

Waterfront Revitalization

What exactly those plans are haven't been decided yet. "We are talking about multiple things including a covered structure and bringing bands or even an ice skating rink," said Green. "It's very preliminary right now. We're working on ideas and designs that may even include another fountain in the future."

The beautification project on the lakefront has taken a step forward already. Town of Webb employees and volunteers created a nice way to welcome visitors to the area -  with flowers, spelling out Old Forge.

Credit - Barbara Green
Credit - Barbara Green
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Credit - Barbara Green
Credit - Barbara Green
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Northern Lights In Old Forge

It's not really common to see northern lights in Central New York, but photographer Kurt Gardner captured the beautiful conformation of them near Old Forge. We're usually too far south of the North Pole, but sometimes we get lucky.
Auroras are caused by the Sun. The Sun is not only hot and bright, but it's also full of energy and small particles that fall toward Earth. NASA says the protective magnetic field around Earth shields us from most of the energy and particles, and we don't even notice them.
The amount of energy the Sun sends, depends on the streaming solar wind and solar storms. During one kind of solar storm called a coronal mass ejection, the Sun expels a huge bubble of electrified gas that can travel through space at high speeds.
When a solar storm comes toward us, some of the energy and small particles can travel down the magnetic field lines at the north and south poles into Earth's atmosphere. There, the particles interact with gases in our atmosphere resulting in beautiful displays of light in the sky. Oxygen gives off green and red light. Nitrogen glows blue and purple. [NASA]