Welcome to another edition of 'When in Rome' with Cindy. Today we're talking about the Rome Club.

Megan Postal, Director of The Rome Historical Society, tells us the 'Rome Club' was located where the present Fort Stanwix sits.

 "The Rome Club was kind of a gentleman's club, a community club, a gathering place for Rome's prominent lawyer's and businessman ..." 

One of the interesting things people point out is the Elm Tree. It was rumored to be a sapling on the actual Fort Stanwix. The Elm was cut down for Urban Renewal, but a portion of its trunk has been saved, so it's not lost to history forever.

The Cannon is also notable in the postcard of the Rome Club. It was from Fort Stanwix and displayed right out in front until World War II, and was then lost to the scrap metal drives.

"A lot of community functions and Rome's history happened right here in these doors."

The Rome Club was important in Rome's history throughout its life. It served as a home for lawyer's, abolitionists and prominent men. But, before that, it was the Barnes-Mudge home to the Rome Attorney and State Assemblyman Wheeler Barnes in 1828. He served in the New York State Congress during the abolishment of slavery. In 1833 Barnes sold the house to Joseph Stringham. In 1838, Stringham sold the home to William M. Tallman. And in 1841, Tallman sold to 35-year-old Alva Mudge.

Mudge was another important owner and was active in Rome's industry.  He was the founder of the Rome Gas Light Company, and vice-president of the Rome Exchange Bank. Mudge was also very active in Civic issues. Postal says "A lot of community functions and Rome's history happened right here in these doors."

The Rome Club was ultimately torn down for Urban Renewal in the 1970s. The Rome Historical Society has a lot of photographs so stop in and relive the history of the Rome Club 9 to 3 Tuesday through Friday and 10 to 2 on Saturdays.


Bonus Video: