The Coxsackie virus is spreading in Upstate NY, even making its way to some Utica schools. One mom says she's had enough of parents sending their sick kids to school.

The Coxsackie virus, also known as hand foot and mouth disease, is spreading among several Upstate NY districts, including Broadalbin-Perth, Cohoes, Amsterdam, Gloversville, and Fonda-Fultonville school districts. The spread has prompted letters from superintendents and disinfecting of classrooms. NewYorkUpstate.com reports that the virus spread quickly across a football team near Albany, prompting cancellation of the team's game.

One Utica mom, who says she's a parent at Watson-Williams, says she's seen Coxsackie at her child's school as well, and has a message for her fellow parents: keep your kids home.

Christina Connor says "Watson Williams really need to get it together. Parents need to know that this hand feet and mouth thing is really going around and these parent that see it on the kids need to KEEP the (NSFW WORD) KIDS HOME." You can see the uncensored post here

Coxsackie, or hand foot and mouth disease, is a highly contagious viral infection. It causes a blister-like rash that, as the name implies, involves the hands, feet and mouth.
According to the Department of Health, the main symptoms are a characteristic rash, and a slight fever.

Who gets hand, foot and mouth disease?

The infection usually occurs in children under 10 years of age, but occasionally can occur in young adults.

How is it spread?

The virus is spread by direct contact with nose and throat discharges, blisters and feces of infected people.

What are the symptoms and when do they start?

Symptoms of fever, poor appetite, runny nose and sore throat can appear three to five days after exposure. A blister-like rash on the hands, feet and in the mouth usually develops one to two days after the initial symptoms.

What can be done to prevent the spread of this disease?

Children who feel ill or have a fever should be excluded from group settings until the fever is gone and the child feels well. Thorough hand washing and care with diaper changing practices is important as well. (In other words, STAY HOME FROM SCHOOL.)

To be clear, no Central New York school is immune from this disease - it just comes down to good hand-washing, and a little bit of luck.

Is this a problem in your child's school? What's your rule for keeping your kids home?